CEILING WORKS

A ceiling is an overhead interior surface that covers the upper limits of a room. It is not generally considered a structural element, but a finished surface concealing the underside of the roof structure or the floor of a story above. Ceilings can be decorated to taste, and there are many fine examples of frescoes and artwork on ceilings especially in religious buildings. A ceiling can also be the upper limit of a tunnel.
The most common type of ceiling is the dropped ceiling, which is suspended from structural elements above. Panels of drywall are fastened either directly to the ceiling joists or to a few layers of moisture-proof plywood which are then attached to the joists. Pipework or ducts can be run in the gap above the ceiling, and insulation and fireproofing material can be placed here. Alternatively, ceilings may be spray painted instead, leaving the pipework and ducts exposed but painted, and using spray foam.
A subset of the dropped ceiling is the suspended ceiling, wherein a network of aluminum struts, as opposed to drywall, are attached to the joists, forming a series of rectangular spaces. Individual pieces of cardboard are then placed inside the bottom of those spaces so that the outer side of the cardboard, interspersed with aluminum rails, is seen as the ceiling from below. This makes it relatively easy to repair the pipes and insulation behind the ceiling, since all that is necessary is to lift off the cardboard, rather than digging through the drywall and then replacing it.

TYPES OF CEILING WORKS

Ceiling works can be classified primarily based on the type of materials used. Each material offers unique advantages and disadvantages. A combination of materials can offer both functional and aesthetic features.

Plaster of Paris

Plaster of Paris (POP) is among the most popular materials used in a variety of commercial as well as residential roofing applications. POP is basically gypsum sans its water content available in powdered form. It hardens when water is added and makes for a good ceiling material.

Wood Ceiling

Wooden false ceilings have excellent natural patterns and textures that can please the eye. Wood is a good material to work with. Wooden panels can come in the form of hollow blocks, boards or panels. They are easy to install often with just screws and nails. They are most suitable for cold climates.

Gypsum

Gypsum is a sulfate of calcium available as an evaporite mineral. It is a popular material for false ceilings because of its thermal and sound insulation, lightweight and fire resistance properties. It is also a soft material. Square gypsum boards can be hung from an iron framework to build a false ceiling.

Fibre Ceilig

Fibre false ceilings are gaining popularity in commercial applications because they are available at low costs, can be installed easily and offer many functional benefits. However, fibre ceiling panels are not suitable for residential applications because they lack aesthetic appeal.